Thank you to this Oakland A’s pitcher for taking a stand on this ridiculous and homophobic “Kiss Cam” practice. Just because a person, a cameraman, or a crowd hide their homophobia by encapsulating it in humor doesn’t make it any less damaging or threatening. 
In many ways, casual homophobia is worse than overt homophobia. The bulk of society has progressed to the point that people shouting “faggots” at a group of gay people are going to be viewed with revulsion. But, when you couch the same homophobia in humor it’s much more palatable to a much wider audience. Yet, the end result is still achieved. The “humorist” has planted the seeds of discomfort into everyone’s mind. And those seeds have a tendency to sprout at important, pivotal moments such as when people are casting ballots on marriage equality, when someone doesn’t feel quite comfortable hiring a gay person but isn’t exactly sure why, or when they feel slightly uncomfortable at learning their child’s teacher is gay. 
An observation by NBC Sports (from its story about the tweet):

…ask yourself how a publicly funded and operated ballpark can still get away with doing a thing, the sole purpose of which is to make tens of thousands of people laugh at the possibility that two men might actually want to kiss. And which encourages straight people to either be humiliated or to pretend to be the part of a minority and to try to act how they think that minority acts in comically exaggerated ways.

Thank you to this Oakland A’s pitcher for taking a stand on this ridiculous and homophobic “Kiss Cam” practice. Just because a person, a cameraman, or a crowd hide their homophobia by encapsulating it in humor doesn’t make it any less damaging or threatening. 

In many ways, casual homophobia is worse than overt homophobia. The bulk of society has progressed to the point that people shouting “faggots” at a group of gay people are going to be viewed with revulsion. But, when you couch the same homophobia in humor it’s much more palatable to a much wider audience. Yet, the end result is still achieved. The “humorist” has planted the seeds of discomfort into everyone’s mind. And those seeds have a tendency to sprout at important, pivotal moments such as when people are casting ballots on marriage equality, when someone doesn’t feel quite comfortable hiring a gay person but isn’t exactly sure why, or when they feel slightly uncomfortable at learning their child’s teacher is gay. 

An observation by NBC Sports (from its story about the tweet):

…ask yourself how a publicly funded and operated ballpark can still get away with doing a thing, the sole purpose of which is to make tens of thousands of people laugh at the possibility that two men might actually want to kiss. And which encourages straight people to either be humiliated or to pretend to be the part of a minority and to try to act how they think that minority acts in comically exaggerated ways.

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  1. bessarion reblogged this from electradaddy
  2. gryffindorlion reblogged this from lefthandsuzukimethod
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  4. lefthandsuzukimethod reblogged this from helloimbecca
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  6. it-only-takes-a-spark reblogged this from electradaddy and added:
    That’s my team :) (pun intended, yes).
  7. baritonepats reblogged this from kaechan91
  8. loggingmolly reblogged this from electradaddy and added:
    This has always rubbed me the wrong way, glad to see a story on it and a tweet from my team!
  9. bumbleeebeees said: Well said. Especially the last paragraph. I wonder what would have resulted if it actually WAS a gay couple they landed on, purely by chance, and they kissed. That would’ve been grand and beautiful.
  10. electradaddy posted this
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